Adélaïde Gregorio Sins – Paul Ricœur et le débat démocratique. Une théorie du juste à trois usages: téléologique, déontologique et sagesse pratique.

October 16, 2019 Leave a comment

Le CEPP , affilié à la Chaire Unesco, a le plaisir de vous inviter:

Conférencière: Adélaïde Gregorio Sins, spécialiste, notamment de Paul Ricoeur.
La conférence aura lieu demain midi (jeudi) au département de science politique.

Le titre : « Paul Ricœur et le débat démocratique. Une théorie du juste à trois usages:téléologique, déontologique et sagesse pratique. »
Voici le lien vers l’information :
https://politique.uqam.ca/babillard/conference-paul-ricoeur-et-le-debat-democratique/
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Digital History and Philosophy of Science / Les approches numériques en Histoire et Philosophie des Sciences – 1er novembre – UQAM W5215

October 15, 2019 Leave a comment
Les approches numériques en Histoire et Philosophie des Sciences / 
Digital History and Philosophy of Science
vendredi | Friday
1er novembre 2019 
9h30 – 18h00
UQAM
Pavillon Thérèse-Casgrain (W)
Département de philosophie, Salle W-5215
455, boul. René-Lévesque Est
Montréal, H2L 4Y2
Entrée libre, s’inscrire auprès de | Free access, please register by email to: cirst@uqam.ca
Horaire | Schedule
9h30-10h10 | François Claveau (U. de Sherbrooke) A Bibliographic History of the Social Sciences and Humanities
10h10-10h50 | Christopher D. Green (York U.) What We Find When We Transform the Full Text of Psychology Journals into Social Networks
10h50-11h10 | Pause café/coffee break
11h10-11h50 | Thibault Racovski (IHPST-Paris 1) Studying the concep-tual dynamics of evolutionary novelty research with phylomemies
11h50-12h30 | Christophe Malaterre (UQAM) The Recipes of Philosophy of Science: Topic-Modeling and Associative Rules
12h30-14h | Pause dîner/lunch break
14h-14h40 | Vincent Larivière (U. Montréal) Text-mining museums: an analysis of the Harvard collection of scientific instruments
14h40-15h20 | Charles Pence (U. C. Louvain) Analyzing the biological literature with evoText
15h20-15h40 | Pause café/coffee break
15h40-16h20 | Alexander Klein (McMaster U.) Two Challenges for Digital Historians: Modeling Causes and Propositional Attitudes
16h20-17h20 | Table ronde/round table « Digital approaches in HPS: contributing to existing questions or answering new ones?
17h20-18h | Rafraîchissements/Cocktail
Information | Information
malaterre.christophe@uqam.ca
charles.pence@uclouvain.be

L’activité se tiendra en anglais |
The event will take place in English

Demi-journée d’étude/Half-day workshop – The concept of function in biology: New philosophical perspectives

September 30, 2019 Leave a comment
English will follow (the workshop will take place in English).

Demi-journée d’étude

Le concept de fonction en biologie : Nouvelles perspectives philosophiques

vendredi 4 octobre 2019, 13h30 – 18h00

UQAM, Pavillon Thérèse-Casgrain (W), Salle W-5215

Cette demi-journée d’étude rassemblera des chercheuses et chercheurs en philosophie de la biologie dont les travaux offrent des perspectives nouvelles sur le concept de fonction biologique. Y seront entre autres discutés les enjeux soulevés par la consonance téléologique et/ou normative du concept de fonction, ceux de la possibilité et de la nature des explications fonctionnelles en biologie, ceux qui concernent la relation à établir entre le fonctionnement des entités biologiques et les fonctions de leur parties, et ceux soulevés par le projet philosophique d’unification de la notion de fonction.

Half-day workshop

The concept of function in biology: New philosophical perspectives

Friday October 4 2019, 13:30 – 18:00

UQAM, Thérèse-Casgrain Building (W), Room W-5215

This half-day workshop will gather philosophy of biology researchers whose work offers novel perspectives on the concept of biological function. Will be discussed, among other things, issues raised by the teleological and/or normative dimensions of the function concept, those pertaining to the possibility and the nature of functional explanations in biology, those concerning the relationship between the functioning of biological entities and the functions of their parts, and those raised by the philosophical project of unifying the various uses of the function notion.   

Programme/program

13h30-14h10 | Justin Garson

(Hunter College)

Edmond Goblot’s (1858-1935) Selected Effects Theory of Function: A Reappraisal

14h10-14h50 | Parisa Moosavi

(York University)

Can Artificial Machines Have a Natural Good?

14h50-15h30 | Antoine C. Dussault

(Collège Lionel-Groulx/CIRST)

Functions Need not Explain the Presence of their Bearers

15h30-16h | Pause/Coffee break

16h-16h40 | Brandon Conley

(Colgate University)

From Dysfunction to Disease

16h40-17h20 | Christophe Malaterre

(UQAM/CIRST)

Which Functions Do Ribozymes Have? A Plea for Pluralism

17h20-18h | Rafraîchissements/Cocktail

Organisation/organization

Centre interuniversitaire de recherche sur la science et la technologie (CIRST)

Chaire de recherche du Canada en philosophie des sciences de la vie

Partenariat/partnership

Réseau montréalais de philosophie des sciences/Montréal philosophy of science network

Collège Lionel-Groulx

Hille Paakkunainen – Virtue and Practical Inference

September 20, 2019 Leave a comment

The Department of Philosophy will host Hille Paakkunainen on Tuesday, October 1, 2019 as part of the Concordia Philosophy Speaker Series.

Speaker: Hille Paakkunainen is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Syracuse University. She works in metaethics, epistemology, and philosophy of action.

Time:  Tuesday, October 1, 2019, 3 to 5 p.m.

Location:  Concordia Political Science Department, Room H-1220, H – Henry F. Hall Building (1455 De Maisonneuve Blvd. W.)

Title: Virtue and Practical Inference

Abstract:  In this talk, Dr. Paakkunainen will argue that virtues of character are dispositions of practical inference, and that neo-Humean belief-desire psychology is inadequate to account for them.

Link: https://www.concordia.ca/cuevents/artsci/philosophy/2019/07/25/hille-paakkunainen-philosophy-speaker-series.html?c=artsci/philosophy/news/events

This is a free public lecture. All are welcome.

 

Mariana Larison – Social Sciences and Philosophy: A Common Problem, A Common Temporality

September 20, 2019 Leave a comment

The Department of Philosophy at Concordia University will host Mariana Larison on Wednesday, September 25, 2019 as part of the Concordia Philosophy Speaker Series.

Speaker: Dr. Mariana Larison is a researcher at the National Council of Scientific Research of Argentina (CONICET), where she is currently working on the phenomenology of the institution. She is the author of numerous works on the philosophical thought of Maurice Merleau-Ponty.

Time:  Wednesday, September 25, 2019 3 to 5 p.m.

Location: Room H-1220 H – Henry F. Hall Building (1455 De Maisonneuve Blvd. W.) Sir George Williams Campus

Title: Social Sciences and Philosophy: A Common Problem, A Common Temporality

Link: https://www.concordia.ca/cuevents/artsci/philosophy/2019/08/14/mariana-larison-philosophy-speaker-series.html?c=artsci/philosophy/news/events

This is a free public lecture. All are welcome. The venue is wheelchair accessible.

Nancy E. Snow – Neo-Aristotelianism and the Challenge of Germline Genome Editing

September 20, 2019 Leave a comment

The Department of Philosophy will host Nancy Snow on Friday, November 8th, 2019 as part of the Concordia Philosophy Speaker Series.

Speaker: Nancy E. Snow is Professor of Philosophy and Director of the Institute for the Study of Human Flourishing at the University of Oklahoma.

Time:  Friday, November 8th, 2019, 3 to 5 p.m.

Location: LB-362 LB – J.W. McConnell Building (1400 De Maisonneuve W.) Concordia University

Title: Neo-Aristotelianism and the Challenge of Germline Genome Editing

Abstract:  Germline genome editing is a new kind of technology that can produce heritable changes in members of many kinds of species. The speed, flexibility, and kind of heritability made possible by genome editing make it especially important to consider with care its implications for human goods and virtues, as well as whether it raises challenges for neo-Aristotelian ethical naturalism. In part I, I offer a brief overview of developments in genome editing. In part II, I briefly sketch the main contours of neo-Aristotelian ethical naturalism and discuss scientifically-based problems that arise for it, situating germline genome editing among those problems.  In part III, I raise questions for Aristotelian conceptualizations of goods and virtues in light of germline genome editing using the framework developed in Nussbaum (1988).

Link: https://www.concordia.ca/cuevents/artsci/philosophy/2019/07/02/nancy-snow-philosophy-speaker-series.html?c=artsci/philosophy/news/events

This is a free public lecture co-presented by the Social Justice Centre and the Montreal Philosophy of Science Network. All are welcome.

Owen Ware – Kant and the Fate of Freedom

September 20, 2019 Leave a comment

The Department of Philosophy will host Owen Ware on Friday, October 25, 2019 as part of the Concordia Philosophy Speaker Series.

Speaker: Dr. Owen Ware is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the University of Toronto. His areas of specialization include Kant and 19th Century Philosophy, with a focus on German Idealism. He is the author of two books, Kant’s Justification of Ethics and Fichte’s Moral Philosophy, both forthcoming with Oxford University Press. Dr. Ware also has research interests in contemporary ethics, social and political philosophy, continental philosophy, and South Asian philosophy

Time:  Friday, October 25, 2019, 3 to 5 p.m.

Location: Room H-1271 H – Henry F. Hall Building (1455 De Maisonneuve Blvd. W.) Sir George Williams Campus

Title: Kant and the Fate of Freedom

Abstract:  Kant’s effort to defend the co-existence of transcendental freedom and natural necessity is one of the crowning achievements of the first Critique. Yet by identifying the will with practical reason in his moral philosophy, he lent support to the view that the moral law is the causal law of a free will—the result of which, as Reinhold argued, left immoral action impossible. However, Reinhold’s attempt to separate the will from practical reason generated difficulties of its own, which Maimon was quick to point out. By identifying freedom with indifferent choice, Maimon argued, Reinhold had no resources to explain why a free will acts at all. My aim in this article is to show how Fichte’s theory of freedom seeks to reconcile these two commitments: the key lies in what I call Fichte’s Genetic Model, according to which indifferent choice is the original condition of the will, but a condition we must actively overcome.

Link: https://www.concordia.ca/cuevents/artsci/philosophy/2019/07/25/owen-ware-philosophy-speaker-series.html?c=artsci/philosophy/news/events

This is a free public lecture. All are welcome.