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McGILL UNDERGRADUATE COLLOQUIUM IN PHILOSOPHY

January 30, 2011 Leave a comment

McGILL UNDERGRADUATE COLLOQUIUM IN PHILOSOPHY

FEBRUARY 2011

7:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M.

Wednesday, February 2, 2011

Leacock Building, Room 927

Join us for great discussion with fellow philosophy students.

Students, professors, and friends are welcome.

Light refreshments will be served.

Psychoanalytic Approaches to the Rex Nemorensis:

Allegory, Archetype, and Fantasy

Emma Ryman, 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm

The ancient Roman ritual of the King of the Grove (the Rex Nemorensis) serves as a powerful interpretative tool for exploring countless aspects of the human psyche on both an individual and a societal level. Taking a psychoanalytic approach to this ritual – involving the continual challenge and murder of a succession of priests at the Grove of Diana in Aricia – weaves together the personal unconscious, the collective unconscious, and the fantasies of death and rebirth contained within them both. As an instantiation of a life-death-rebirth deity, the Rex Nemorensis can be seen as a projection of the rebirth archetype present in the collective unconscious. By examining the death-rebirth fantasy and approaching the Rex Nemorensis on an individual, as well as a representative, level, the continuum between the outwardly aggressive and the inwardly self-destructive aspects of the death drive is revealed. Further, by seeing the desire for death as a desire to return to the womb, the seemingly suicidal impulse of the fugitive slave in the ritual can be seen in itself as a desire not just for death, but also for rebirth. The King of the Grove exemplifies how the structures of psychical life are ever-present in the rituals and institutions which society constructs and in which society partakes.

Perceiving and Communicating Temporally Extended Events

Jonathan Silver, 8:00 pm to 9:00 pm

In this paper I attempt to make sense of Augustine’s solution, in Confessions XI, to the problem how we perceive and communicate about temporally extended events if it is impossible that temporally extended events can exist. I argue that Augustine’s solution is that although temporally extended events cannot actually exist, they can apparently exist in the form of retained stretches of times present in a perceiver’s memory. In addition, I argue, especially based on Augustine’s view that there is no way to track objective time, that Augustine’s theory of time leads to the conclusion that there is no way to confirm that we accurately perceive and communicate about temporally extended events; however, this is not a problem for his theory…

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McGill Undergraduate Colloquium in Philosophy

October 14, 2010 Leave a comment

3RD ANNUAL/FALL 2010

McGILL UNDERGRADUATE COLLOQUIUM IN PHILOSOPHY

An evening of food, fun, and filosophy

6:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M.

Tuesday, October 19, 2010

Leacock Building, Room 927

Join us for great discussion with fellow philosophy students.

A light dinner, snacks, and coffee will be served.

Students, professors, and friends are welcome.

ETHICAL NATURALISM AND EXTERNALIST SEMANTICS

Rachel Rudolph, 6:00 P.M. to 7:00 P.M.

Ethical naturalism holds that moral properties are natural properties. In this presentation, I will consider challenges arising from moral language and discourse. Moore famously raised his Open Question Argument, claiming that moral terms function so that they could not possibly refer to natural properties. More recently, Tersman argued that the phenomenon of moral disagreement makes ethical naturalism impossible. Using a Kripke-style externalist account of reference, I will show how the ethical naturalist can answer both of these challenges.

THE SOCRATISM OF EPICTETUS: THE INFLUENCE OF PLATO’S GORGIAS ON STOICISM

Mark Lamarre, 7:00 P.M. to 8:00 P.M.

Late Stoicism, which flourished in Rome in the first and second centuries, AD, marked an effort to eschew the middle Platonist perspectives of middle Stoicism and a return to the emphasis on moral philosophy of early Stoicism. The Stoic philosopher Epictetus adopted this approach through an original adaptation of Socratic principles. This paper studies his process of adaptation mainly by examining how Plato’s Gorgias influenced both early Stocism and Epictetus himself.

HEIDEGGER, COMMUNITY, AND POLITICS

Zoé Gagnon-Paquin, 8:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M.

When Heidegger delivered his infamous 1933 Rectoral Address, he spoke in favor of the Nazi regime and called for a renewal of the ”spiritual mission” of the German people. I find that while the Address largely draws on concepts from Being and Time, it operates on a definition of Dasein not found in the 1927 text.

McGill Undergraduate Colloquium

November 16, 2009 2 comments

Hello,
The next installment of the undergraduate colloquium is scheduled for Tuesday, November 17th, from 6-8 PM in Leacock 927. There are two presentations set up (abstracts appended) as well as the usual bevy of cookies, tea and coffee. I hope that you can make it.
best,
Brooke Struck

Andy Yu – Metaphors… Literally
In this paper, I critically examine Davidson’s challenge to the view that metaphors have metaphorical meanings in addition to literal meanings. I begin by suggesting that we might think that metaphors have metaphorical meanings for two reasons: first, that they are so obviously false (or true) that we think something other than literal meaning is at stake, and second, that they draw our attention to similarities in the world. We reason by analogy with ordinary uses and literal meanings that metaphorical uses are linked to metaphorical meanings. Next, I review Davidson’s more general program for the philosophy of language, showing that it is incompatible with the view that metaphors have both literal and metaphorical meanings. So he must reject the view if he is to maintain his program. Finally, I discuss Davidson’s negative claim that the view confuses meanings with their uses, as well as his positive claim that metaphors can achieve their wow-factor without appealing to metaphorical meanings.

Anna Cook – Ethics of Care
Drawing on the works of Carol Gilligan, Nel Noddings, Grace Clement, Virginia Held and Eva Kittay, I expound care ethics’ definitions of the self, of care-giving and of care-receiving in contrast to the concepts as defined by an ethics of justice. I will explore how an ethics of care can be applied to a medical ethical dilemma in which a patient refuses life-saving treatment. Viewing this medical dilemma through a care framework raises further questions on the ethics of care— such as whether the mother-child relationship is an appropriate model for the physician-patient relationship, what role proximity plays in the care-giving of strangers, and how care ethics can prevent abuses of care within the physician-patient relationship.

McGill Undergraduate Colloquium of Philosophy

February 5, 2009 Leave a comment

The first-ever McGill Undergraduate Colloquium of Philosophy is coming very soon!! Please consult the attached schedule for dates, times, and topics! See you all there!!

DAY ONE: CONTEXTUALISING SCIENCE & MATHEMATICS
Monday, February 9

THE FOUNDATIONS OF SCIENTIFIC PURSUIT: CAN WE DO SCIENCE WITHOUT ETHICS?
Charles Pitman 5:00 – 5:45

RUSSELL’S THEORY OF TYPES: DEVELOPMENT AND CRITICISMS
Andy Voellmer 6:00 – 6:45

BAHÁ’U’LLÁH AND KUHN: PATTERNS OF ENLIGHTENMENT IN WESTERN RELIGION AND SCIENCE
Ilya Shodjaee-Zrudlo 7:00 – 7:45

DAY TWO: THEMES FROM ANCIENT & MEDIEVAL METAPHYSICS
Thursday, February 12

PERFECTION IN MAIMONIDES AS THEORETICAL AND PRACTICAL RATIONALITY
Jonathan Fine 5:00 – 5:45

DOUBLE UNFREEDOM IN THOMAS NAGEL AND THE STOICS
Tom de Kok 6:00 – 6:45

PARMENIDES’ GROUNDING OF EPISTEMOLOGY ON METAPHYSICS
Andy Yu 7:00 – 7:45

DAY THREE: TRUTH & AESTHETICS
Tuesday, February 17

ATTENDING TO THE BODY IN DANCE RECONSTRUCTION
Wilson Blakely 5:00 – 5:45

ART AND TECHNOLOGY IN HEIDEGGER’S VIEW OF MODERNITY
Nestor Bailly 6:00 – 6:45

ON TRUTH: KIERKEGAARD AND THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA
Brooke Struck 7:00 – 7:45

LEACOCK BUILDING, ROOM 927

Discussion to follow each presentation. Coffee and snacks will be served.
Undergraduate and graduate students, professors, and friends are all welcome!

philosophy.colloqium@gmail.com