Home > Uncategorized > Philosophy Speaker Series Fall 2022: Reza Hadisi, Kristin Andrews, Chike Jeffers & Rob Wilson

Philosophy Speaker Series Fall 2022: Reza Hadisi, Kristin Andrews, Chike Jeffers & Rob Wilson

The Department of Philosophy is pleased to present Reza Hadisi on Friday, October 14th, 2022, as part of the Concordia Philosophy Speaker Series.

Speaker: Reza Hadisi is Assistant Professor in Philosophy at the University of Toronto. Much of his work is informed by his interest in the history of philosophy, especially Kant and the medieval Islamic philosophers.

Time: Friday, October 14, 3 to 5 p.m.

Title: Between the Particular and the Universal: Lessons from Suhrawardi

Location: Webster Library LB-362, J.W. McConnell Building, 1400 De Maisonneuve Blvd. W.

Abstract: According to a long tradition in philosophy, imagination, unlike reason and sensation, is only a secondary source of knowledge. In this talk, Reza Hadisi will discuss the views of a pivotal figure in the history of medieval Arabic and Persian philosophy, Shihab al-Din al-Suhrawardi (1154–1191) who argued that imagination is a primary source of knowledge. While many valuable studies have already analyzed the role of imagination in Suhrawardi’s philosophy, these accounts often leave readers with the impression that unless we buy into the entire philosophical, and perhaps theological framework, of his thought, we would not be able to accept or even understand the underlying theory of imagination. Reza Hadisi will argue that Suhrawardi’s epistemology of imagination has philosophical merits independently, and some of the arguments for it can be reconstructed outside the general framework of his philosophy.

The lecture is free and open to all. The venue is wheelchair accessible.







The Department of Philosophy is pleased to present Kristin Andrews on Friday, November 4th, 2022, as part of the Concordia Philosophy Speaker Series.

Speaker: Kristin Andrews is York Research Chair in Animal Minds and Professor of Philosophy at York University (Toronto), where she also helps coordinate the Cognitive Science program, serves on the board of directors of the Borneo Orangutan Society Canada, and is a member of the College of the Royal Society of Canada. She is the author of numerous publications on social minds, animal minds, and ethics.

Time: Friday, November 4, 3 to 5 p.m.

Title: Social Norms in Nonhuman Animals

Location: Webster Library LB-362, J.W. McConnell Building, 1400 De Maisonneuve Blvd. W.

Abstract: Social norms—rules governing which behaviors are deemed appropriate or inappropriate within a given community—are typically taken to be uniquely human. The view that norms are ‘human unique’ stems from commitments regarding the psychological capacities required for having them and skepticism that animals possess these prerequisites. However, among norm cognition researchers, there is little agreement about the cognitive architecture that underpins social norms in humans. In this lecture, Kristin Andrews draws inspiration from the progress made in animal culture research. She will develop an operationalized account of social norms as a socially maintained pattern of behavioral conformity within a community and offer methods for studying social norms in wild and captive primate populations.

The lecture is free and open to all. The venue is wheelchair accessible. Light refreshments will be served.



The Department of Philosophy is pleased to present Chike Jeffers on Monday, November 14th, 2022, as part of the Concordia Philosophy Speaker Series.

Speaker: Chike Jeffers is Canada Research Chair in Africana Philosophy and Associate Professor at Dalhousie University.

Time: Monday, November 14, 3 to 5 p.m.

Title: Eloquent Responses: Ethical and Political Themes in Ancient Egyptian Literature

Location: Webster Library LB-322, J.W. McConnell Building, 1400 De Maisonneuve Blvd. W.

Co-presented by the Social Justice Centre, this lecture is free and open to all. The venue is wheelchair accessible. A coffee and tea reception will follow in the Friends of the Library Room LB-361.



The Department of Philosophy is pleased to present Rob Wilson on Friday, November 18th, 2022, as part of the Concordia Philosophy Speaker Series.

Speaker: Rob Wilson is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Western Australia in the School of Humanities. His work on eugenics seeks to make both positive and transformational changes to marginalized peoples in various ways.

Time: Friday, November 18, 3 to 5 p.m.

Title: Philosophical Silences: Some Thoughts on Race, Gender, and Eugenics

Location: Webster Library LB-362, J.W. McConnell Building, 1400 De Maisonneuve Blvd. W.

Abstract: Drawing on the work of Charles Mills on race and of Susan Babbitt on gender, as well as the speaker’s own on eugenics and disability, this talk raises some questions about philosophy’s boundaries, history, sociology, and community engagement. The discipline of philosophy has had (and continues to have) an uneasy relationship with race, gender, and disability. The hope is for the talk to spark some constructive thinking about how the future need not be like the past.

The lecture is free and open to all. The venue is wheelchair accessible. Light refreshments will be served.



For more information regarding the Philosophy Speaker Series, please contact faculty member coordinator Dr. Nabeel Hamid.

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