Home > Uncategorized > Elliott Sober == Conférences Hugues Leblanc == 14-16 avril 2021 == UQAM

Elliott Sober == Conférences Hugues Leblanc == 14-16 avril 2021 == UQAM

February 10, 2021 Leave a comment Go to comments

[English follows] Conférences Hugues-Leblanc 202114-16 avril – Département de philosophie, UQAM

Conférencier invité: ELLIOTT SOBER (Université du Wisconsin à Madison)

Elliott Sober donnera un cycle de trois conférences sur le thème: PUTTING PROBABILITY TO WORK IN PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE

« Ockham’s Razor »
Mercredi 14 avril, 15h30-17h00 (heure normale de l’est)
Commentatrice: Molly Kao (Université de Montréal)
Résumé: Ockham’s razor says that simpler theories are better than theories that are more complex, but what does “better” mean?  The question isn’t whether simpler theories are easier to understand and work with, nor is the question whether simpler theories are more beautiful.  Rather, the question is why the simplicity of a theory is relevant to saying what the world is like.  Here I describe two “parsimony paradigms” that establish how simplicity can be relevant to that endeavor. 

« Realism, Empiricism, and Instrumentalism »
Jeudi 15 avril, 15h30-17h00 (heure normale de l’est)Commentateur: Christophe Malaterre (UQAM)
Résumé: Scientific Realism says that an attainable goal of science is to figure out which theories are true in what they say about observable and unobservable features of reality.  Empiricism says that the goal is more modest – to find theories that are empirically adequate, meaning that they are true in what they say about observables.  Instrumentalism says that scientific theories are merely useful instruments for making accurate predictions.   Are empiricism and instrumentalism different?  Here I discuss arguments that aim to justify or discredit each of these three philosophies.

« Values in Science »
Vendredi 16 avril, 15h30-17h00 (heure normale de l’est)Commentateur: Matthew Barker (Université Concordia)
Résumé: It is obvious that scientists, like everyone else, should take morality into account in deciding what to do, but are ethical considerations relevant to what they should believe?  Blaise Pascal’s Wager and William James’s Will to Believe provide an introduction to thinking about this question.  I then consider Richard Rudner’s article “The Scientist qua Scientist Makes value Judgments,” where it is argued that the ethical consequences of believing a theory need to be considered in deciding whether you should believe it.  Finally, I consider relatively new ideas in statistics that describe a context in which the goals of scientists are relevant to the question of which estimation procedure should be used.

INFORMATIONS ET INSCRIPTION
Organisateur et modérateur: Christophe Malaterre (malaterre.christophe@uqam.ca). Informations: https://philo.uqam.ca/conferences/conferences-hugues-leblanc/
Toutes les conférences auront lieu en ligne sur Zoom. Veuillez noter que ces conférences seront données en anglais. Elles seront aussi enregistrées. Il vous sera possible de désactiver votre caméra en tout temps  Accès libre sur inscription (obligatoire)https://uqam.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZwkdOuhpz0rH9BXvAfYNhLmA37Jl22fFKu3

À PROPOS DE ELLIOTT SOBER
Elliott Sober est professeur au département de philosophie de l’Université du Wisconsin à Madison, titulaire des chaires Wiliam F. Vilas et Hans Reichenbach. Sa recherche s’inscrit dans les domaines de la philosophie des sciences et de la philosophie de la biologie de l’évolution. Il est tout particulièrement reconnu pour ses travaux sur la notion de parcimonie en relation avec l’évaluation des théories et ses très nombreuses contributions à la philosophie de la biologie. Il a aussi publié sur la question des faits probants et de la probabilité, sur le réalisme scientifique et l’instrumentalisme, sur les lois de la nature, sur le problème du cerveau et de l’esprit ou encore sur le naturalisme. Ses publications incluent Ockham’s Razors — A User’s Manual (Cambridge University Press, 2015),  Did Darwin write the Origin Backwards? (Prometheus Books, 2011), Evidence and Evolution — the Logic Behind the Science (Cambridge University Press, 2008), Unto Others — The Evolution and Psychology of Unselfish Behavior (avec David Sloan Wilson, Harvard University Press, 1998) et Philosophy of Biology (Westview Press, 1993).
À PROPOS DES CONFÉRENCES HUGUES LEBLANC
Le rendez-vous annuel des conférences Hugues-Leblanc célèbre la mémoire du grand logicien et philosophe québécois Hugues Leblanc (1924-1999). Se déroulant sur trois jours, cet événement se structure autour d’une série de présentations données par une conférencière ou un conférencier de renommée internationale, et d’interventions de professeures et professeurs issus d’universités canadiennes ou étrangères, sur une thématique relevant de la philosophie analytique.
Cet événement est organisé avec l’appui du Département de philosophie, de la Chaire de recherche du Canada en philosophie des sciences de la vie, du Centre interuniversitaire de recherche sur la science et la technologie et du Réseau montréalais de philosophie des sciences 
——-
2021 Hugues-Leblanc lectures14-16 April – Philosophy department, UQAM

Guest speaker: ELLIOTT SOBER (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Elliott Sober will deliver three lectures on the theme: PUTTING PROBABILITY TO WORK IN PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE

« Ockham’s Razor »
Wednesday, April 14th, 15:30-17:00 (Eastern Standard Time)Commentator: Molly Kao (Université de Montréal)
Abstract: Ockham’s razor says that simpler theories are better than theories that are more complex, but what does “better” mean?  The question isn’t whether simpler theories are easier to understand and work with, nor is the question whether simpler theories are more beautiful.  Rather, the question is why the simplicity of a theory is relevant to saying what the world is like.  Here I describe two “parsimony paradigms” that establish how simplicity can be relevant to that endeavor. 

« Realism, Empiricism, and Instrumentalism »
Thursday, April 15th, 15:30-17:00 (Eastern Standard Time)Commentator: Christophe Malaterre (UQAM)
Abstract: Scientific Realism says that an attainable goal of science is to figure out which theories are true in what they say about observable and unobservable features of reality.  Empiricism says that the goal is more modest – to find theories that are empirically adequate, meaning that they are true in what they say about observables.  Instrumentalism says that scientific theories are merely useful instruments for making accurate predictions.   Are empiricism and instrumentalism different?  Here I discuss arguments that aim to justify or discredit each of these three philosophies.

« Values in Science »
Friday, April 16th, 15:30-17:00 (Eastern Standard Time)Commentator: Matthew Barker (Université Concordia)
Abstract: It is obvious that scientists, like everyone else, should take morality into account in deciding what to do, but are ethical considerations relevant to what they should believe?  Blaise Pascal’s Wager and William James’s Will to Believe provide an introduction to thinking about this question.  I then consider Richard Rudner’s article “The Scientist qua Scientist Makes value Judgments,” where it is argued that the ethical consequences of believing a theory need to be considered in deciding whether you should believe it.  Finally, I consider relatively new ideas in statistics that describe a context in which the goals of scientists are relevant to the question of which estimation procedure should be used.

INFORMATION/REGISTRATION
Organization: Christophe Malaterre (malaterre.christophe@uqam.ca). Information: https://philo.uqam.ca/conferences/conferences-hugues-leblanc/ All three lectures will take place on Zoom. Please note that the lectures will be delivered in English. They will also be recorded. You will have the possibility to deactivate your camera at all times.  Registration (required)https://uqam.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZwkdOuhpz0rH9BXvAfYNhLmA37Jl22fFKu3
ABOUT ELLIOTT SOBER
Elliott Sober is Wiliam F. Vilas Research Professor and Hans Reichenbach Professor in the department of philosophy at University of Wisconsin-Madison. His areas of research are philosophy of science and philosophy of evolutionary biology. He is renowned in particular for his groundbreaking work on parsimony in connection with theory evaluation,  and his numerous contributions to the philosophy of biology. He also has written about evidence and probability, scientific realism and instrumentalism, laws of nature, the mind-body problem and naturalism. His publications include Ockham’s Razors — A User’s Manual (Cambridge University Press, 2015), Did Darwin write the Origin Backwards? (Prometheus Books, 2011), Evidence and Evolution — the Logic Behind the Science (Cambridge University Press, 2008), Unto Others — The Evolution and Psychology of Unselfish Behavior (with David Sloan Wilson, Harvard University Press, 1998) and Philosophy of Biology (Westview Press, 1993). 
ABOUT THE HUGUES LEBLANC LECTURES
The annual Hugues-Leblanc lectures honor the memory of the great logician and philosopher Hugues Leblanc of Québec (1924-1999). Taking place over three days, this event is organized around a series of lectures delivered by an internationally renowned speaker and commentaries by Canadian or foreign professors on a theme relevant to analytic philosophy.
This event is organized with the support of the department of philosophy at UQAM, Canada Research Chair in Philosophy of the Life Sciences, Centre interuniversitaire de recherche sur la science et la technologie (CIRST) and the Montreal Philosophy of Science Network. 

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