Home > arpp, philosophy of science, physics, umontreal > Paul Raymond-Robichaud – Mission Impossible

Paul Raymond-Robichaud – Mission Impossible

Conférence

Mardi 20 Mars, 15h30, au local 5340 du CRM (Centre de Recherches
Mathématiques), Pavillon André-Aisenstadt, 2920, chemin de la Tour, 5e étage,
campus de l’Université de Montréal.

“Mission Impossible”

Paul Raymond-Robichaud

(Université de Montréal, Labo. Informatique Théorique et Quantique)

« Imagination is more important than knowledge » -Albert Einstein
« What is proved by impossibility proofs is lack of imagination » -John Bell

In 1935, Einstein, Podolsky, Rosen wrote that Quantum Mechanics must be
incomplete under the assumption of locality and realism. While in 1964, John Bell proved
that no theory of the type considered by Einstein (Hidden variable theories) is compatible
with locality and realism. Locality is the principle according to which no action performed at
point A can have an effect on point B faster than at the speed of light. Realism is the principle
according to which any observation merely reveals what was already in the physical world. A
theory is complete whenever it is capable of accounting for all physical facts.
A simple proof in the spirit of Bell’s impossibility theorem will be presented. The
impossible will be accomplished and we will present our view that Quantum Mechanics is in
fact deterministic, local and realistic, in total contradiction with most people’s perception of
Bell’s theorem, thanks to our new interpretation of Quantum Mechanics.

The CRM is a few minutes away from Metro Univ. de Montréal (take the automatic staircase leading up to the campus). If necessary, here is more info on the location of the Aisenstadt building:
http://www.crm.umontreal.ca/coord/CampusUdeM.pdf
http://www.crm.umontreal.ca/coord/contact_fr.shtml.

Conférence organisée au sein de l’Atelier de Recherche Philosophie – Physique,

Resp. Louis Vervoort, Bur. 425, Département de Philosophie, Université de Montréal,

louis.vervoort@umontreal.ca.

  1. Paul Raymond-Robichaud
    March 17, 2012 at 12:28 pm

    This talk is suitable for a general audience. I will not assume any specialized knowledge of mathematics or quantum mechanics.

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