McGill Undergraduate Colloquium in Philosophy

October 14, 2010 Leave a comment Go to comments

3RD ANNUAL/FALL 2010

McGILL UNDERGRADUATE COLLOQUIUM IN PHILOSOPHY

An evening of food, fun, and filosophy

6:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M.

Tuesday, October 19, 2010

Leacock Building, Room 927

Join us for great discussion with fellow philosophy students.

A light dinner, snacks, and coffee will be served.

Students, professors, and friends are welcome.

ETHICAL NATURALISM AND EXTERNALIST SEMANTICS

Rachel Rudolph, 6:00 P.M. to 7:00 P.M.

Ethical naturalism holds that moral properties are natural properties. In this presentation, I will consider challenges arising from moral language and discourse. Moore famously raised his Open Question Argument, claiming that moral terms function so that they could not possibly refer to natural properties. More recently, Tersman argued that the phenomenon of moral disagreement makes ethical naturalism impossible. Using a Kripke-style externalist account of reference, I will show how the ethical naturalist can answer both of these challenges.

THE SOCRATISM OF EPICTETUS: THE INFLUENCE OF PLATO’S GORGIAS ON STOICISM

Mark Lamarre, 7:00 P.M. to 8:00 P.M.

Late Stoicism, which flourished in Rome in the first and second centuries, AD, marked an effort to eschew the middle Platonist perspectives of middle Stoicism and a return to the emphasis on moral philosophy of early Stoicism. The Stoic philosopher Epictetus adopted this approach through an original adaptation of Socratic principles. This paper studies his process of adaptation mainly by examining how Plato’s Gorgias influenced both early Stocism and Epictetus himself.

HEIDEGGER, COMMUNITY, AND POLITICS

Zoé Gagnon-Paquin, 8:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M.

When Heidegger delivered his infamous 1933 Rectoral Address, he spoke in favor of the Nazi regime and called for a renewal of the ”spiritual mission” of the German people. I find that while the Address largely draws on concepts from Being and Time, it operates on a definition of Dasein not found in the 1927 text.

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